Believe In Your Summer '08

Submitted by Andy on Tue, 07/01/2008 - 15:42

The summer reading list is a tradition as old as the printed word and the acknowledgment of seasons. Having been a careless and fancy free performer for the past several summers said reading list usually consists of cleanup on a series of esoteric topics and angular science fiction/steampunk novels. But now I am a musicologist, and thus this has become Serious Business. The goal is not just to pass the looming entrance exams, but to the pass them with the grace and brutality of the ninja. Therein, the following schedule has been developed.

Eric Salzman - Twentieth Century Music: An Introduction Carl Dahlhaus - Nineteenth Century Music Charles Rosen - The Classical Style Claude Palisca - Baroque Music Allan Atlas - Renaissance Music Jeremy Yudkin - Music in Medieval Europe

For bonus points:

Douglass Seaton - Ideas and Style in the Western Musical Tradition Actually finish the goddamn Alex Ross

This will be accompanied by marching through all 173 selections in the Norton and doing at least nominal score study for each one. We will surely perish. Any thoughts?

Submitted by Matthew (not verified) on Wed, 07/02/2008 - 11:28

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A book that's somewhat out of date but was an enormous help in getting through my BU comps: Richard Crocker's "A History of Musical Style." Great for exam prep because there's heaps of musical examples.

Submitted by Andy H-D (not verified) on Wed, 07/02/2008 - 21:59

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I'd say that not a lot has happened in the field of medieval musics and such, except it is now my job to know that there indeed has been.

Either way, ILL'ed!

Submitted by Guido's Biatch (not verified) on Mon, 07/07/2008 - 08:41

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Yes - Crocker! Your musicological studliness is blinding me. I won't give you too much flack, as long as you can take ein Moment away from your life of solitude to play in the Dells!

Submitted by Andy H-D (not verified) on Tue, 07/08/2008 - 13:10

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I still have to actually read the books, alas. But yes, the Dells it is.